Why Study Philosophy?

Famous Philosopher

Introduction

Philosophy is concerned with the fundamental questions that arise when human beings think about the nature of the universe and the human condition. These questions include: Are humans capable of free choice or is our every act determined by either physical or social conditions? Are humans naturally selfish or are we capable of altruistic actions? What makes for a morally right act or a just society? What is the nature of knowledge? What is the relationship between mind and matter? Is there a god and what can be known about God? Philosophy courses foster one's ability to analyze, evaluate, and construct plausible explanations addressing these philosophical issues. 

Students of philosophy who become adept at analyzing issues, concepts, and evidence, who are able to construct and critique arguments, and who can forge and express coherent and consistent views on philosophical matters are well-prepared to enter the fields of law, medicine, the ministry, and, of course, education. In addition to enriching their critical thinking skills and writing skills, students of philosophy acquire knowledge of value theory, political philosophy, ethics, logic, metaphysics, and epistemology. 

This provides an excellent preparation for a wide variety of careers.

Philosophy as a Pre-Law Major

The study of philosophy is widely recognized as a valuable tool for those interested in attending law school. National results show that philosophy majors score higher on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) than do majors from any other area of the Liberal Arts. Courses that are particularly valuable for this purpose are Political Philosophy (PHIL 9), Introduction to Philosophy (PHIL 6), Contemporary Moral Issues (PHIL 7), and Critical Thinking (PHIL 3, PHIL 5).

Philosophy as a Pre-Med Major

The study of philosophy is widely recognized as a valuable tool for those interested in attending Medical school. National results show that philosophy majors score higher on the (MCAT) than do majors from any other area of the Liberal Arts. Courses that are particularly valuable for this purposes are Contemporary Moral Issues (PHIL 7) Introduction to Philosophy (PHIL 6), and Critical Thinking (PHIL3, PHIL5).

Careers in College Teaching

Many of those who study philosophy do so in order to pursue a graduate degree and teach on the university or community college level. There are current studies which suggest that there will be an increasing demand for college faculty over the next five to ten years as large numbers of current faculty reach retirement age at the same time as the student population is predicted to grow.

Seminary or Religious Studies

Students who are planning on attending a seminary or doing graduate work in religion often study philosophy. Courses in philosophy that are particularly valuable for this purpose are Introduction to Philosophy (PHIL 6), Contemporary Moral Issues (PHIL 7), and Comparative Religions (PHIL 8), and Critical Thinking (PHIL3, PHIL5).

 

For more information feel free to arrange an appointment with one of our faculty.